Top 15 Amazing Nutrient Rich Superfoods for Fall

Eating Mangoes and watermelons on the porch, going out for picnics, grilling and making sand castles with our little ones are the things which come to our mind when we talk about summer, but there is something about cooler weather and the arrival of fall that changes things.

We stop thinking about beach outings, and instead focus on which ski resorts may be opening early. It somehow seems easier to really get into work or school, instead of daydreaming about playing in the sun.

Now as the leaves turn colors and the temperature starts to drop, it’s time to break out your repertoire of fall foods. This is the season for apples, brussel sprouts, tangerines and pumpkins etc.. Thus, it is no surprise that we see more of these superfood products both at the market and local grocery stores.

So while we are settling into the new fall season, here are top 15 amazing nutrient rich superfoods for fall, that can not only nourish your body but also foster a sense of well-being

 

APPLES

apples

Long associated with the start of fall, apples imported from halfway around the world are now available year-round in the produce section of your local store. Fall is when you can pick them locally; seek out organic fruit, which can give you all the more reason to eat the skin without worrying about pesticide residue. Apple’s skins contain the antioxidant quercetin and the fruits themselves contain calcium, Vitamin C and folate.

 

PEARS

 

Pears

 

The sweet and juicy taste makes this fruit a crowd-pleaser. Cooking can really bring out their fabulous flavor, so try them baked or poached.  They are very good source of Vitamin C and copper. As a very good source of dietary fiber, pears might logically be expected to help protect us from development of type 2 diabetes (or DM2, which stands for “diabetes mellitus type 2) as well heart disease. Adequate intake of dietary fiber is a long-established factor in reducing our risk of both diseases, and in the case of pears, this benefit may be even more pronounced due to the helpful combination of both soluble and insoluble fiber in this fruit.

 

 

RUTABAGA

 

rutabaga

 

A cross between a turnip and a cabbage, rutabagas are a popular Swedish dish. To utilize their earthy flavor, add them to casseroles, puree them with turnips and carrots to make a sweet soup, or roast them with ginger, honey, or lemon. Rutabagas are members of the cabbage family known as “cruciferous vegetables”. These types of veggies (just like broccoli, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts) have got nutrition which may be cancer-fighting as well as great for your overall health.

 

 

CAULIFLOWER

 

cauli

 

With compounds that may help prevent cancer, tons of vitamin C, and phytonutrients that may even lower cholesterol levels, it’s kind of amazing how good cauliflower can be for you. You can even use it to make faux rice or mashed potatoes.This food is very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. It is also a good source of Protein, Thiamin, Riboflavin, Niacin, Magnesium and Phosphorus.

 

 

SQUASH

 

winter-squash

Its antioxidants help reduce inflammation and improve symptoms of asthma in addition to arthritis.Squash contains many vital poly-phenolic anti-oxidants and vitamins. Similar to other Cucurbitaceae members, this too is one of the low-calorie vegetables, which provides just 45 calories per 100 g. It contains no saturated fats or cholesterol; however, is rich source of dietary fiber and phyto-nutrients. Squash is one of the common vegetables that often recommended by dieticians in the cholesterol controlling and weight reduction programs.

 

PUMPKIN

 

pumpkin

The bright orange color of pumpkin is a dead giveaway that pumpkin is loaded with an important antioxidant, beta-carotene. Beta-carotene is one of the plant carotenoids converted to vitamin A in the body. In the conversion to vitamin A, beta carotene performs many important functions in overall health.Current research indicates that a diet rich in foods containing beta-carotene may reduce the risk of developing certain types of cancer and offers protect against heart disease. Beta-carotene offers protection against other diseases as well as some degenerative aspects of aging.

 

SWEET POTATOES

sweet-potato

Sweet potato is rich source of anti-oxidants, vitamins (richest source of vitamin-A), minerals, and dietary fiber that are essential for optimal health.Sweet potato provides a good amount of vital minerals such as iron, calcium, magnesium, manganese, and potassium that are very essential for enzyme, protein, and carbohydrate metabolism.

 

TURNIPS

Turnips

 

As an excellent source of vitamin K and a good source of omega-3 fatty acids (in the form of alpha-linolenic acid, or ALA), turnip greens provide us with two hallmark anti-inflammatory nutrients. Vitamin K acts as a direct regulator of our inflammatory response, and ALA is the building block for several of the body’s most widely-used families of anti-inflammatory messaging molecules. While glucobrassicin (a glucosinolate found in many cruciferous vegetables, and the precursor for the anti-inflammatory molecule indole-3-carbinol) does not appear to be present in turnip greens in significant amounts, other glucosinolates present in turnip greens may provide important anti-inflammatory benefits and are the subject of current research.

 

KIWI

 

Kiwis

 

Kiwi fruit is a delicious fruit that contains flavonoids, minerals and vital vitamins such as vitamin C. This sweet fruit tastes like a combination of pineapple, banana and strawberry. Named after the flightless brown bird kiwi, the fruit is a delight to the taste buds and is loved by all.Use this sweet fruit to add a tropical flavor to your recipes. It’s great mixed with strawberries, cantaloupe, or oranges and can be combined with pineapple to make a tangy chutney.

 

POMEGRANATE

pomogernate1

One of the oldest known fruits, found in writings and artifacts of many cultures and religions, the pomegranate (punica granatum) is an original native of Persia. This nutrient rich superfood, antioxidant rich fruit has been revered as a symbol of health, fertility and eternal life. Pomegranate seeds are full of B vitamins, potassium, and folic acid. They’re also a great vegan source of iron. If eating the fruit isn’t your thing and you don’t mind giving up the beneficial fiber from pomegranate seeds, you can also drink pomegranate juice to get some of the same health benefits. One study found that pomegranate juice was better than grape juice or red wine when it came to protecting your body from harmful free radicals and at preventing high blood pressure.

 

TANGERINE

tangerines

The tangerine is a type of mandarin orange that is usually available from November through April. They are slightly smaller than oranges and are characterized by their bright orange color and defined segments. While oranges sometimes need to be peeled with a knife, tangerines can be peeled and segmented easily by hand. Tangerines are rich in vitamin C, which is good for your immunity. Vitamin C works to boost your immunity by acting as an antioxidant that protects your cells from the damage caused by free radicals. Free radicals are highly reactive atoms that are produced when the substances in your body react with each other.This process is called oxidation, and the free radicals that oxidation produces can trigger cell death. Vitamin C’s antioxidant power comes from its ability to scavenge free radicals and disarm their propensity for damage.

 

DATES

 

dates

Dates are a good source of protein, dietary fiber and are rich in vitamin A, B1, B2, B3, B5.and Vitamin C. The fiber supplied by a few grams of this fruit is one of the best known health benefits of dates. The Vitamin A in dates is known to have antioxidant properties and is important for good vision. Vitamin A is also necessary to maintain healthy and glowing skin. Dates are very helpful in guarding against night blindness problems and this is one of best known health benefits of dates. Vitamin A found in dates is approx 149 IU per 100 gram of the fruit.Consumption of fruits rich in vitamin A is known to provide resistance against lung and oral cavity cancers. For a healthy living, the American Cancer Society recommends intake of 20-35 grams of dietary fiber per day supplied through dates.

 

GRAPEFRUIT

grapefruit 1

Rich in the Nutritional Powerhouse Vitamin C. Grapefruit is an excellent source of vitamin C, a vitamin that helps to support the immune system.Tart and tangy with an underlying sweetness, grapefruit has a juiciness that rivals that of the ever popular orange and sparkles with many of the same health promoting benefits. Although available throughout the year, they are in season and at their best from winter through early spring. Grapefruit contains pectin, a form of soluble fiber that has been shown in animal studies to slow down the progression of atherosclerosis. In one study, animals fed a high-cholesterol diet plus grapefruit pectin had 24% narrowing of their arteries, while animals fed the high-cholesterol diet without grapefruit pectin had 45% narrowing.Both blond and red grapefruit can reduce blood levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, and red grapefruit lowers triglycerides as well, shows a study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry.

 

PARSNIPS

parsnips

Parsnips may seem like an exotic vegetable that is unfamiliar to many, but what they have to offer your diet is twofold: Their fiber content will make you feel full and their sweet taste will help alleviate hunger pangs, allowing you to faithfully stick to your true course toward weight-loss. Parsnips shine as a fiber source. They’re high in soluble fiber, the type that helps lower cholesterol and keep blood sugar on an even keel. They’re a surprising source of folic acid, that B vitamin women planning a family need to help reduce the risk of certain disabling birth defects. Folic acid also plays a role in reducing heart disease and may help prevent dementia and osteoporosis bone fractures. And potassium, an aid to blood pressure, is present in ample quantities. Unlike their carrot cousins, however, parsnips lack beta-carotene.

And our last but not the least contender in this list is ….

 

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

Brussels-sprouts-on-plate

 

Brussels sprouts are an important dietary source of many vitamin antioxidants, including vitamins C, E, and A (in the form of beta-carotene). The antioxidant mineral manganese is also provided by Brussels sprouts.They are an excellent source of vitamin C and vitamin K. They are a very good source of numerous nutrients including folate, vitamin A, manganese, dietary fiber, potassium, vitamin B6 and thiamin (vitamin B1) and a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, iron, phosphorus, protein, molybdenum, magnesium, riboflavin (vitamin B2), vitamin E, calcium, and niacin. In addition to these nutrients, Brussels sprouts contain numerous disease-fighting phytochemicals including sulforaphane, indoles, glucosinolates, isothiocynates, coumarins, dithiolthiones, and phenols.

 

 LOOKING FOR QUICK INFUSION OF NUTRIENT RICH SUPERFOODS IN A GREAT TASTY WAY   –  LIVING FEAST

 

 

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