Healthy & Easy Home Baked Vegetable Pizza

4
10 minutes
  • 4 large (100% whole grain) tortillas (I love Ezekiel sprouted wheat) or pitas
  • 2 cups pasta sauce, no salt added or low sodium
  • 1 garlic clove minced
  • 1/2 cup chopped shiitake mushrooms
  • 1/2 cup chopped red onion
  • 10 ounces frozen broccoli florets, thawed and finely chopped
  • 1/4 cup shredded nondairy mozzarella-type cheese * (optional)


Preheat the oven to 400 degrees (for super crisp). Place tortillas or pitas on two baking sheets and warm for 5-10 minutes. Once tortilla has started to slightly crisp on edges, remove from oven.Spoon on the pasta sauce and place the garlic on the crust first. Sprinkle evenly with the mushrooms, onion and broccoli. Add a light sprinkle of cheese. Bake for 30 minutes.

* Daiya brand is a good choice

How To Make Indian Vegetable Khichdi

This simple South Asian recipe is delicious, easy to cook and is easy to digest. This is a very good option if you want to cook something fast but do not have lot of options. The combination of herbs and spices will fill your kitchen with a wonderful fragrance, and reward your tongue with spiciness that isn’t overly hot.

Serves: 6 (makes 9 cups)

Ingredients

  • 3½ cups water
  • ¾ cup dry brown basmati rice
  • ¾ cup dry red lentils
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon ground coriander
  • ½ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric powder
  • ¼ teaspoon ground cardamom seed
  • 1 teaspoon ground clove
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped (10 ounces/2 cups chopped)
  • ½ tablespoon minced garlic (2 large cloves)
  • 1 teaspoon freshly minced ginger
  • 3 cups water
  • 1 medium Yukon gold potato, diced into small cubes (8 ounces, about 1-1/4 cups)
  • 1 medium yam, diced into small cubes (8 ounces, about 1-1/2 cups)
  • 2 large ribs celery, diced (about 1 cup)
  • 1¼ cup green peas (thaw first if frozen)
  • 4 cups roughly chopped curly kale (about 3 large leaves)

Instructions
1. In a large soup pot, stir together the water, rice, lentils, and spices (cumin, coriander, red pepper, turmeric, cardamom, clove). Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and cook for 45 minutes. While the rice and lentils are cooking, chop and prepare the remaining ingredients.
2. About 15 minutes before the rice and lentils are done cooking, place a large skillet or saucepan on high heat with 2 tablespoons of water. Once the water starts sizzling, add the chopped onion and sauté for 3 minutes (adding water as needed to prevent sticking). Add the garlic and ginger, and sauté for another 2 minutes, taking care not to burn the garlic, adding water as needed.
3. Add to the onions, garlic and ginger: 3 cups water, potatoes, yams, and celery, and return to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook covered for 7 minutes. Stir in the peas and kale and cook an additional 3 minutes (still covered). (The potatoes should now be tender.)
4. Add the onion-potato mixture to the pot of rice and lentils and stir well. Serve immediately.

Note: Instead of potatoes and yams, you can use beans, cauliflowers or carrots and if you want to replace brown rice, try Quinoa or Oats.
kichidi1

Vegan Mushroom and Green Peas Masala

Ingredients

• 2 tablespoons avocado oil or plain water
• 1 teaspoon cumin seeds
• 1 small red onion, grated (using the large side of the box grater)
• 2 cups of thickly sliced button mushrooms (about 8 oz.)
• 1/2 teaspoon powdered coriander
• 1/2 teaspoon powdered cumin
• 1/2 teaspoon red cayenne pepper
• 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
• 1/2 cup of green peas (I used frozen)
• Fresh cilantro to garnish

Instructions

1. Heat the oil or plain water and add in the cumin seeds and wait until the seeds begin to sizzle.
2. Add in the grated onion and cook until the onion begins to turn softly golden.
3. Add in the the mushrooms and mix well.
4. Stir in a pinch of sea-salt (if needed), powdered coriander, cumin, red cayenne pepper and the black pepper with the green peas and mix well.
5. Cover and cook for five minutes.
6. Stir in the cilantro and serve.

Red Lentil Pumpkin Dal

 

Ingredients
• 1 cup red lentils
• 1 1/2 cup water
• 1 cup low sodium vegetable broth
• 2 tablespoons avocado or sesame oil
• 2 cloves garlic, minced
• 2 teaspoons garam masala
• 1 tablespoon curry powder
• 1/2 teaspoon cardamom
• 2 tablespoons tomato paste
• 1/2 cup pumpkin puree
• 1/3 cup coconut milk
• 1 teaspoon sea salt (optional)
• 1/4 cup fresh cilantro, minced

Instructions
1. Rinse lentils to remove any debris. Place lentils, water, and broth in a stockpot over medium heat and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer until cooked through, stirring occasionally. Lentils will break apart and get mushy as they cook.

2. Heat oil in a small skillet over medium-low heat. Add garlic and cook 30 seconds, until fragrant. Add spices and let them toast in the oil for 30 seconds.

3. Stir in tomato paste and pumpkin puree. Let mixture sit for a minute. Fold in coconut milk until combined and just heated through.

4. When lentils are cooked, add pumpkin mixture, salt, and cilantro Fold all ingredients together and let simmer for 5-10 minutes.

5. Serve alone or with quinoa or brown rice.

Dear Nutrient Rich Superfoods

Dear Daniel,

We trust you received your product order from Nutrient Rich Superfoods?
We would like to follow up with you on your experience.

John and Mariahna, and the Nutrient Rich Team

Yes, indeed.  I actually brought the whole lot of them with me to Los Angeles where my wife has a temporary corporate apartment compliments of Walt Disney Imagineering.  She joined WDI in February at a high level and is working to establish their new Asia Regional Office which means we will be relocating to Hong Kong around April of 2016.

I LOVE the product so far ~ still haven’t sampled all three Superfood Infusions.  But I’m anticipating that Strawberry Banana Beet / and Pomegranate Cocoa will be every bit as wonderful as as the Apple Mango Kale is!  I’ll update you in a couple of days regarding my experience with the other flavors and will be sharing them with some friends back in New Orleans that are likely customers.

I’ll also be glad to send a selfie / pic with me and the new products as your colleague Mariahna Suzan had requested.  I simply haven’t gotten to that point yet.

I’m very excited to have the product in my lifestyle arsenal for optimal living. I absolutely plan to take a case with me when I head back to India in November, and am already strategizing for getting the product to Hong Kong next year.

So far it’s everything I had hoped it would be and more!  The flavor blends and ingredients are perfect in my opinion.

Wishing you massive success with getting the product out to the largest possible group of customers, and promise to do my part in advancing the same.

Be Well,

Daniel C. Dreher

Squeeze Packs: The Most Convenient and Nutritious Way to Eat on the Go

When our founder, Performance Coach and Lifestyle Entrepreneur John Allen Mollenhauer, discovered a new food breakthrough, it didn’t come from a sports nutrition aisle or from the local Vitamin Shoppe or GNC. It came from the most unexpected place he could have imagined – an unusual visit to a drugstore. This was the “aha moment” for Nutrient Rich Superfood Infusions.

Was there a larger trend behind this amazing discovery? Absolutely! It’s the whole idea of tasty food in a flexible pouch or squeeze pack.

Pouches containing pureed or liquefied food first disrupted the most obvious market—baby food. Pouches were ideally designed for infants who don’t yet have teeth or coordination with utensils and who have a natural affinity for the nipple spout. The pouches were so successful that soon products were made for toddlers and younger children. And now pouches are being aimed at adults who want a fast, healthy, portable, great tasting food on the go.

But adults don’t want “adult baby food,” or baby food gone badass. They want sophisticated ingredients like pomegranate and chia seeds, savory flavors beyond fruits and vegetables, and nutritional components suited for adults. And busy adults are seeking simpler lifestyles; nowhere is that more appreciated than with a great tasting, credibly healthy, and convenient way to fuel and nourish your body when you’re in a rush.

Beyond the essential delivery of whole, plant-based, nutrient-rich superfoods, the trend of the pouch is as much about the authentic foods they deliver as it is about the flexible packaging itself. Pouches lend themselves to a wide array of life situations when you just don’t have the time to sit down for a meal. Whether on a bike, on a hike, in between meetings or games at a tournament, the flexible pouch can be a major player in your life.

We live on-the-go lives, whether that’s engaged on a device or in service to others. And while this does not preclude the idea that one can make quick and easy meals, a large percentage of the time consumers require a way to fuel their body on the go. And that’s where the new Nutrient Rich Superfoods is focused. We provide great-tasting organic natural food products in the most convenient ways for consumers so they can maximize their energy to look, feel and perform at their best. Foods that provide what you need, no significant amount of what you don’t, and are in as close to their natural state as possible. This way, what you eat works for you; not against you, the way it does for so many people who default to nutrient poor foods when they don’t have the time or energy to make better choices.

What makes Superfood Infusions unique?

  • Double the size of all other squeeze packs, but not double the cost!
  • Contain 2 servings.
  • Last up to 24 hours opened, for when you need an infusion.
  • Have no added sugar.
  • Only the sugar of about 1-large apple per pack and you need at least one fruit per day!
  • Have 4 grams per protein per squeeze pack.

You can learn more about Nutrient Rich Superfoods here.

Nutrient Rich Superfoods Make Healthy Eating Easier Than It’s Ever Been Before

Nutrient Rich™ Superfoods Solves the Fast Healthy Food Challenge with Launch of Superfood Infusions™

Livingston, NJ. August 12, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — Nutrient Rich Superfoods, of Performance Lifestyle, Inc a leading a natural food products nutrition and lifestyle educational company, has announced the launch of its new line of grab-and-go superfood blends—and they’re already winning awards.

With this launch, Nutrient Rich Superfoods is expanding its company—and its leadership in the emerging nutrient-rich “superfood” revolution—and setting the bar high for premium grab-and-go adult snack foods.

The brand-new Superfood Infusions are delicious organic superfood blends made with real fruits and vegetables—plus chia seeds & B12.

These pure, organic, non-GMO snacks contain no preservatives and no artificial flavors—just nutrient- and fiber-rich food with essential supplements in a convenient flexible pouch that needs no refrigeration.

“It’s like getting a fresh homemade smoothie blend without the preparation, mess, or cleanup, especially when you don’t even have time to make a smoothie!” says creator John Allen Mollenhauer, CEO of Nutrient Rich Superfoods, a Performance Lifestyle, Inc company and someone committed to healthy eating and performance living.

The initial Superfood Infusions™ line of Daily Essentials offers three outstanding, sophisticated and nutrient-packed flavors to start:

Mango Apple kale
Pomegranate, Banana, cocoa
Strawberry, Banana, beets

Nutrient Rich™ Superfoods is a natural food products and educational company that inspires, educates and supports people in eating more plant-based, nutrient-rich food. The company’s mission is to help busy, active people nourish, detoxify, stabilize and strengthen themselves and optimize the way they eat for healthy, high-performance living—through education as well as superior natural products.

Superfood Infusions™ were conceived as a solution for on-the-go-healthy eating—to ensure that no matter how fast we’re moving, we don’t have to compromise on nutrition, health, taste or convenience.

Nutrient Rich founder John Allen Mollenhauers’ desire to eat at an unusual trip to a drugstore led to a search for something decent, an impulse purchase of organic baby food in a pouch—and an “aha” moment when he realized how this concept could be a breakthrough in healthy eating for adults.

Even the most informed people with the highest standards and best intentions often default to less healthy options when busy or low on energy; but when you succeed in those time and energy-squeezed periods of the day, usually the rest of your diet follows suit.

Nutrient Rich decided to gear its business toward solving this rampant modern nutritional challenge.

Mollenhauer says, “We believe that Americans deserve a great-for-you class of grab-and-go food options—and at Nutrient Rich Superfoods, we’re making it our business to create exactly that.”

“We intend to provide the most nutritious, highest quality natural food products with the most convenient delivery—and the most outstanding flavor, because we want to see people enjoy eating healthy more than they do eating unhealthy, he added.

Superfood Infusions™ come in resealable squeeze packs that are engineered for maximum convenience and freshness. Each Superfood has a 12-month shelf life.

Flexible food pouches are an emerging a trend in food marketing. But in developing Superfood Infusions, the company set out to change the game by providing more than just the “adult baby food” many similar products offer.

The ideal on-the-go food pouches for adults offer not only fruits and vegetables, but the latest and most proven superfoods, supplemental nutrients, and sophisticated flavors.

Superfood Infusions set a new “gold standard” for quality, nutrient density, and flavor. The products are all organic and Non-GMO and will be fully certified. They’re free of gluten, soy, added colors, food preservatives, allergens, added sugar, or artificial ingredients.

Other ways Superfood Infusions™ are different from standard squeeze-pack snacks on the market:

  • Superfood Infusions offer generous adult-sized 7.5 oz. portions—the largest package on the market with the best value—so that just one is satisfying.
  • Superfood Infusions include supplemental essentials (chia seeds for omega 3 fats and fiber, plus  B12—saving money on additional supplementation of these essential nutrients)
  • Superfood Infusions contain 4 g each of health-promoting protein – 100% plant based.
  • Superfood Infusions use the nutrient-rich super fruits and vegetables with the most exceptional nutritional values and antioxidant properties.
  • Superfood Infusions are sold in packs of six (not four) that will last most people a full week. 45 oz. of nutrient-rich superfood per 6-pack, versus only 16 oz. – 20 oz. of other companies.
  • Superfood Infusions provide the best value when you consider the quality of ingredients, size, and added nutrients, which is why co-founder Mariahna Suzan explains, “We deliver on the value proposition of an on-the-go snack – satisfaction.”

They’re also the first in a planned lineup of more nutrient-rich food solutions to support people in fueling today’s fast-paced, dynamic performance lifestyles.

Future products will include situation-specific formulations (addressing unique nutritional and packaging needs) and more advanced mini-meals with proprietary blends and protein.

“We are building this company with our customers,” says Mollenhauer, who will open the company up to crowdfunding to partner with the consumers who want to see the nutrient-rich superfood revolution spread.

The products have begun shipping and it is the company’s intention to listen to customers wants and desires in its new product development so that healthy eating will be the easier than ever before by combining time and energy saving organic natural products with simple quick and easy recipes that company includes in each of its product shipments.

ABOUT Nutrient Rich™ Superfoods

For the past decade, Nutrient Rich has helped to usher in an exciting, emerging movement toward making more plant-based, nutrient-rich food accessible, great tasting, credibly health and convenient.

The Company, Performance Lifestyle, Inc Nutrient Rich Superfoods was founded by CEO John Allen Mollenhauer and his wife Mariahna Suzan. John is a performance coach, certified in advanced Nutritarian Studies, a lifestyle entrepreneur and endurance athlete and bestselling author.

Is a Low-Carb Diet a Genuine Remedy for Obesity? BY T. COLIN CAMPBELL

Republished from Newsweek.

The outrageously high rates of childhood and adult obesity and diabetes in the U.S. may suggest that the U.S. Dietary Guidelines (DG) are not working. After all, these guidelines are meant to protect our health. So how did we find ourselves in this predicament?

As a longtime researcher, contributor to food and health policy, and Cornell University professor emeritus, I offer the following interpretation. The current DG recommendations for healthy levels of fat, protein and carbohydrate consumption will not optimize health. In addition, the scientific research supporting the dietary lifestyle that will optimize health is mysteriously missing from the 700-plus page recommendations.

In a Newsweek article on June 11, 2015, “Food Guidelines Are Broken. Why Aren’t They Being Fixed?” Dr. Jeff Volek asserts that the science being used to justify low-fat dietary recommendations in the DG reports is outdated, and more comprehensive science must be used to create the guidelines.

He also states that most Americans eating a low-fat diet will cut down on full-fat animal products while simultaneously increasing intake of sugar and processed starches. As a result, diabetes and obesity will continue to plague our nation.

Although there is some truth in his comments, his understanding of low-carb diets and scientific research is fundamentally different from mine. I agree that a more comprehensive evaluation of the evidence be considered, but this means including the evidence on the health benefits of a whole-food, plant-based (WFPB) diet, which is omitted from this report.

It should be noted that a low-carb diet often means, by definition, a diet very high in protein and fat (from meat, dairy and eggs). A low-carb, high-protein diet may cause weight reduction initially, but in the long run it is overwhelmingly dangerous and not in our society’s best interest.

The biggest issue is that low-carb diets severely limit the consumption of plant-based whole foods, which are the main foods reversing disease and creating health benefits. A diet of these foods contains about 10 percent fat, 10 percent protein and 80 percent complex carbohydrates. This diet has all the protein we need, the right amount of fat and a rich supply of antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and complex carbohydrates.

Now let’s focus on fat and note that the Standard American Diet has mainly held steady at about 35 to 37 percent fat for decades. Volek and his colleagues incorrectly claim that we experimented with a so-called 30 percent “low-fat” diet during the last few decades, only to see an increase in the prevalence of obesity. This is flat-out wrong.

First off, how is 30 percent fat considered “low-fat” when those eating a diet of plant-based whole foods consume around 10 percent fat? And second, never did the average dietary fat go as low as 30 percent, and even if it did, it would be a trivial change that cannot possibly account for the childhood obesity epidemic. This is similar to comparing someone who smokes four packs of cigarettes a day with someone who smokes three.

And what does “high-protein” mean? For decades, 10 percent dietary calories as protein (RDA, the recommended allowance) has been considered sufficient (if not ideal) for human health. This level of protein is easily provided by a WFPB diet.

But for more than 10 years, the DG Advisory Committee has continued to recommend that a diet with up to 35 percent dietary protein maintains health and prevents heart disease, cancer and other Western diseases. A WFPB diet easily has 10 percent protein—and more, if legumes and leafy greens are emphasized, which enhance health.

On the contrary, if dietary protein is increased by animal source foods, chronic degenerative diseases are greatly increased. Consider the long-term impact of the Atkins (low-carb) diet with regard to disease and you could find that short-term weight loss by overeating meat may be a sad trade-off for real long-term health.

Unlike high-protein, high-fat diets, a WFPB dietary lifestyle provides a remarkably broad ability to resolve illnesses and diagnosed diseases. Heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity and many autoimmune diseases also can be resolved for most people remarkably quickly.

If the DG Advisory Committee and other authorities acknowledged this missing evidence and promoted a WFPB diet, our health care costs in the U.S. could be cut 50 to 75 percent, and rates of preventable, diet-related diseases would plummet. There is no evidence that low-carb diets high in animal protein and fat can achieve this effect.

Low-carb advocates are in denial that a WFPB diet could be a more viable way for Americans to lose weight and live without preventable diseases in the long and short term. However, like the meat, poultry and dairy industries, low-carb supporters want you to ignore this possibility and just eat more meat.

If low-carb advocates would stick to the issue of the over-consumption of refined carbohydrates, we could find an area of agreement. But it is clear to me that when they promote a low-carb diet, they are cleverly choosing words mixed with a little truth to push yet another diet that continues to reinforce unhealthy habits.

T. Colin Campbell is professor emeritus of nutritional biochemistry at Cornell University, and board president of the T. Colin Campbell Center for Nutrition Studies, as published in Newsweek

4 Reasons Why Vitamin D is Essential Supplementation and How to Get it Everyday!

If there were a miracle drug in the vitamin world it might just be Vitamin D” — Joel Fuhrman MD.

Frankly, all 13 essential vitamins are important but nutritional research into Vitamin D has become a very hot topic. The reason is simple; because it is derived from the sun and produced in the skin, the need for its supplementation, how much and in what form is attracting a great deal of debate.

Some even describe Vitamin D as a hormone, even though that appears to have been debunked—25-hydroxy-Vitamin D is appropriately described as a pre-hormone, i.e. a glandular secretory product that is converted peripherally to an active hormone. 

Vitamin D insufficiency affects almost 50% of the population worldwide and over 50 million people in the US alone. An estimated 1 billion people worldwide, across all ethnicities and age groups, have a vitamin D deficiency (VDD).

Symptoms and Health Risks of Vitamin D deficiency…

Symptoms of bone pain and muscle weakness can mean you have a vitamin D deficiency. However, for many people, the symptoms are subtle. Yet, even without symptoms, too little vitamin D can pose health risks. Low blood levels of the vitamin have been associated with the following:

  • Increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease.
  • Cognitive impairment in older adults.
  • Severe asthma in children.
  • Cancer.

This pandemic of “hypovitaminosis D”, which is medical speak for low vitamin D, can mainly be attributed to lifestyle (for example, reduced outdoor activities) and environmental (for example, air pollution) factors that reduce exposure to sunlight, which is required for ultraviolet-B (UVB)-induced vitamin D production in the skin.

How Much Vitamin D Do We Need?
High prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency, not characterized by deficiency syndromes such as rickets, but rather subtle symptoms of decrease function, is a particularly important public health issue because low vitamin D is a now known independent risk factor for total mortality in the general population. The traditional recommended Adequate Intake (AI) for Vitamin D for most adults was 5 ug (200 IU) to 15 uf (600 IU) depending on the source and the age group. Though recently, the Institute of Medicine upped its mean recommendation of 400 IU to 600 IU for children and adults under 70 years of age and 800 IU for adults over 70 for vitamin D sufficiency. You would think the issue would have come to a rest. It hasn’t.

Current studies and consensus within the scientific community suggest that we may need more vitamin D than presently recommended to prevent chronic disease. One well-known nutritional researcher in particular who supports an increased intake of Vitamin D over IOM recommendations, at safe and tolerable limits, and who has compiled the needed insights to hang your hat on is Joel Fuhrman MD. He recently wrote about this in the Huffington Post and did a great job in his summary.

As the number of people with VDD continues to increase, the importance of this pre-hormone in overall health and the prevention of chronic diseases are at the forefront of nutritional research. As few “healthy” foods contain vitamin D, (mushrooms are one good example because fungi hang out in the sun for pretty long time) best practice guidelines recommend supplementation at suggested daily intake and tolerable upper limit levels which we will describe below.

Note, About Mushrooms: Mushrooms are one of the few plant foods which contain ergosterol, a precursor to vitamin D2. The two major physiological forms of active vitamin D for humans are ergocalciferol (D2) and cholecalciferol (D3).  The amount of vitamin D2 in mushrooms can be significantly increased by exposing mushrooms to ultraviolet (UV) light

How Do You Know You’re Low? 

It is also suggested you get a test to measure your serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level as the initial diagnostic test in test your body for deficiency. Treatment with either vegan D3 or animal D3 is recommended for deficient patients. See the difference between Dd and D3. A meta-analysis published in 2007 showed that vitamin D supplementation was associated with significantly reduced mortality.

Known as the “Sunshine vitamin”, most people think they’re going to get all their vitamin D from the sun. So why are so many people deficient in this all too important vitamin among other deficiencies?

For many it’s just a disbelief in supplementation, thinking it’s all about money and unnecessary when there are at least 16 reasons why you might need to supplement, even if you are eating predominantly nutrient-rich superfoods.

Regarding Vitamin D, There are 4  Primary Reasons Why You Want to Supplement. It’s simple:

  1. Lack of sun exposure because of indoor jobs:
  2. Skin color, and distance from the equator.
  3. Their climate (colder climates); plus,
  4. With the depletion of the ozone layer, the amount of sun most people would require to achieve these levels may result in too much skin damage and skin cancer.

The main risk factors for low vitamin D levels include older age, female sex, higher latitudes, winter season, darker skin pigmentation, less sunlight exposure, dietary habits, and the absence of vitamin D fortification in common foods. Further factors include the increase in urbanization, where people tend to live and work indoors, as well as cultural practices that tend towards sun avoidance and the wearing of traditional clothing that covers the skin.

For these reasons, it is appropriate to supplement with vitamin D – however, the doses in standard multivitamins (400 IU’s) are insufficient. For most supplementation with 800 to 2000 IU’s optimizes serum 25(OH) D levels (35-55 ng/ml) for protection against cancer and osteoporosis According to a review by leading nutritional researcher Joel Fuhrman MD, safely without and negative consequences.

Why?

It’s not just for your bones

Vitamin D is known to have protective effects on bone health, by increasing calcium absorption. But that’s not it. It is also has many other critical functions in the body. Vitamin D may help prevent many human diseases including several cancers, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, depression, and autoimmune diseases. Scientists have found that Vitamin D has biological actions in almost every cell and tissue in the human body.

So when most people aren’t in the sun enough nowadays to be making sufficient vitamin D you now have a better understanding for why you must supplement vitamin D everyday.

It’s extremely important for individuals with limited sun exposure to supplement their vitamin D intake. Vitamin D promotes calcium absorption, is crucial for healthy immune function, and is even more effective than calcium for protecting and building bone.

Now that is amazing!

John Allen Mollenhauer is widely recognized as a leading authority on how to live a healthy performance lifestyle. John helps people renew their personal power and achieve their goals in life, business, or sport—without selling health and well-being short. He is also the creator of the new Nutrient Rich® Superfoods line: organic, non-gmo superfood products for people who want to fuel their body right on the go.

1.J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2004 May;89-90(1-5):571-3.

2.J Pharmacol Pharmacother. 2012 Apr-Jun; 3(2): 118–126.

3. 29. Higdon JV et al. Cruciferous Vegetables and Human Cancer Risk: Epidemiologic Evidence and Mechanistic Basis. Pharmacol Res. 2007 March ; 55(3): 224?236

4. Joel Fuhrman  MD, drfuhrman.com/library/article24.aspx

5. http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/vitamin-d-deficiency  Mary Anne Dunkin, Reviewed by Elaine Magee, MPH, RD on May 24, 2014

6. http://www.ars.usda.gov/SP2UserFiles/Place/80400525/Articles/AICR09_Mushroom_VitD.pdf

7. http://iom.edu/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/New%20Material/2_%20RDA%20and%20AI%20Values_Vitamin%20and%20Elements.pdf

8. http://www.nasw.org/article/vitamin-d-levels-determined-how-human-skin-color-evolved

9. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2902062/

What’s In Your Food?

Here is a shocking fact: We are Currently Eating Genetically Engineered Food, But Don’t Even Know About It!

when I found this infographic on Pinterest, I just had to share this with you. If you are new to reading labels or learning about GMOs, this is for you. We no longer have the luxury of opening a bag or box and eating it without worrying about toxic chemicals, GMO’s, high fructose corn syrup and so on. It is your right to KNOW what is in your food, so that you can then make the informed choices to avoid the potential health risks of GMOs until more research on their long-term effects can be done.

gmos2